Breathe

Breathe

I think breathing is something we take for granted. It’s something that your brain tells your body to do and we inhale and exhale without thinking much about it unless we are underwater or in some other way deprived of oxygen, and then it becomes something we have to think about consciously.  And so, while I was aware for a long time that I had the symptoms of sleep apnea, I thought I was getting a good night sleep and doing just fine even if I was annoying other people with my horrible snoring.

Two years ago I suddenly began to go downhill.  I could no longer focus on tasks set before me. Multi-tasking was impossible, something I used to do with ease.  Moving around became more difficult and I gained weight.  My feet took on a dusky appearance and I blamed it on my socks and shoes rubbing off dye and staining my feet.  Only the tips of my toes were pink – a straight line across the top of my foot.  My ankles swelled.  And yet none of this alarmed me, I had an excuse for everything.  That is, until my yearly blood test revealed an elevated red blood cell count that had reached into the dangerous levels.  And I remembered the lab technician having trouble drawing the blood which was thick and didn’t flow well into the vial.  In the middle of filling the tube my blood simply stopped flowing.  She ended up having to start a new draw in my opposite arm in order to fill the vial.  What I thought was some error in procedure turned out to be a symptom of my problem.

After my doctor read the results, she began actively searching for reasons my red blood cell count was so high.  The first step was to check for apnea, so she ordered a night pulse oximeter test.  Overnight I wore a device on my finger to check on my oxygen levels as I slept.  The results revealed that my oxygen was dropping into the 70 to 80 percent range at certain points in the night. My pulse was dropping as low as 34 beats per minute.  To clarify that this was apnea, I took part in a sleep study where I slept in a lab at the hospital and was wired up with every possible kind of monitor and also observed by trained specialists as I slept.  The session was recorded.  About half way through the night the technician shook my shoulder and said I had been identified as someone needing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment.  A mask was fitted on my face and I was hooked up to the CPAP machine and I slept the most refreshing sleep I had had in years.  After a doctor reviewed all the results of the sleep study, it was confirmed that I had apnea up to 40 times per hour, and was never getting to a level of deep sleep even though I wasn’t aware my body was waking me up every minute or less than a minute to remind me to breathe.  I had both obstructive apnea, where the airway becomes blocked, and central apnea, where the brain forgets to tell your body to breathe.  All these years I could have easily died in my sleep and no one would have known why.

Fast forward to now. It’s been a year since I have been using the CPAP machine every single night and I’m doing better in so many ways. My red blood cell count is back in the high normal range, I can enjoy reading again and concentrate on tasks that had been eluding me.  My ability to walk and exercise improved and so did my weight. My feet are normal color again. After two years of being acutely aware of my breathing, I have learned not to take breath and oxygen for granted.  I live in a high altitude area (8,000 feet above sea level).  But even those of you that don’t have environmental or physical challenges to your breathing should pay attention to it.

As we are on the cusp of a new year, make a decision to raise your consciousness by concentrating on every breath you take in and breathe out.  Spend time in non-polluted areas such as the outdoors so that you are breathing in fresh air un-laden with chemicals, heavy metals, poisons from emissions from industry or buildings.  If you smoke, quit.  Don’t let those chemicals you are drawing into your body alter your ability to wholly participate in life.  Don’t let smoking shorten your time on this earth.  When you concentrate on breathing you will increase your overall level of focus, emotional stability, and level of consciousness.

Whatever creative path you follow, you will benefit from increasing your mental focus.  You will have a better understanding of yourself and concepts that once seemed difficult to understand will become knowledge you can easily grasp.  You will have more clarity about yourself and the world around you.  You will improve your life.  Make 2017 the year you start to improve your life, simply by breathing.

 

Author: Jay Warner

Writing is a lifelong passion for me. In my many years of writing I have had the opportunity to help many people in their own writing journeys. I write historical fiction and a broader variety of non-fiction including technical writing, corporate policies and procedures, white papers, safety manuals, interpretations of documents pertaining to governmental entities such as OSHA and DOI, grants, articles, encyclopedia entries, essays, compositions, and more. I have taught high school composition and language arts including Advance Placement, Upward Bound, and Early Literacy for people ages 16-54 who need extra help with reading and writing. I have served as editor of two quarterly magazines: one literary and one historical in nature and have excellent proofreading and editing skills. I would like to help you craft your best work by assisting you with both editing and proofreading. Let's get the words on the page and rock the writing world!