Forty Reasons Why I Write

I’m taking the 40 Reasons “Why Do You Write?” Challenge by Bryan Hutchinson.  Can I come up with forty reasons why I write?  The first eight or so seemed easy; the rest required a little digging.

At first glance forty reasons seem like a lot! But I’m up for the challenge. Thanks Bryan! So here goes.

  • I write:
    1. To fulfill a childhood dream
    2. To inform
    3. To educate
    4. To be heard
    5. To affirm
    6. To be affirmed
    7. To laugh
    8. To make other people laugh
    9. To claim my spot in the company of other writers
    10. To dream
    11. To practice
    12. To ask
    13. To tell my stories
    14. To tell my family’s stories
    15. To tell the stories of the people I love
    16. To tell the stories of the places I love
    17. To reconnect with old friends
    18. To make new friends
    19. To create beautiful images with words
    20. To inspire myself
    21. To inspire others
    22. To think of new ways to say old things
    23. To find my way
    24. To help people think in new and different ways
    25. To release anger
    26. To bring closure to difficult issues
    27. To bring clarity to difficult or confusing issues
    28. To resolve anxiety
    29. To get published
    30. To make a living from my own talents and drive
    31. To be my own boss
    32. To have other people read and react to what I write
    33. Because it’s what I’m good at
    34. Because writing raises my self-esteem
    35. So that I can help other write better
    36. To live life twice – once in the doing and once in the telling
    37. To give voice to social needs
    38. To say something important
    39. Because I am happiest when I am putting words to paper
    40. So I can call myself a writer

Putting this list together was invigorating, empowering, and made me take a good hard look at the reasons why I write.  If you would like to take the 40 Reasons “Why Do You Write?” Challenge by Bryan Hutchinson, go here  http:/positivewriter.com/reasons-why-write-challenge/ and get started!

A Determined Kid

royal-typewriter

A determined kid can achieve most anything he sets out to do. I consider my early writing years to be those between the ages of four and nine when I placed my index finger on my first Royal typewriter and “published” my first poem on a piece of paper easily 20 years older than I was.  This singular act was thrilling beyond what I could have ever imagined. The thrill never left me.  I was a poet.  I was a writer.  The poem, about a dog chasing a fox, was a flop.  Forced rhymes, mundane theme, poor word choices.  But it wasn’t so much the actual poem that made me a writer, it was the act of putting the words on paper, arranging them in a way that was pleasing to me and said what I wanted to say, in a way I wanted to say it.  All the learning of parts of speech, sentence construction, figurative language, tense, structure, and all those other things, were still in my future.  Here’s how it unfolded.

I was visiting my father in his office, a gray shack in the middle of a field.  Technically it was my grandfather’s “field office”.  My grandfather owned and managed oil fields and my father fixed derricks.  A multi-purpose place, mysteriously filled with machinery, tools, cabinets, and dust, it provided plenty to capture the attention of a youngster. But of all the things to do and see, I was drawn to an older model shiny black Royal typewriter sitting on a battered wooden desk. In the desk drawer was a sheath of paper in a notebook my dad said was left over from his college days.  He showed me how to feed the paper and pound the keys to make ink appear.  And I had to pound the keys. Lucky for me I typed with one finger so the long stalks that attached the keys to the letters did not mash together as they did later on when I learned to type faster. Beaming with pride I displayed the poem to my father and he said it was good.  Hearty praise from a man of little words.

Ray Bradbury once said “Run fast, stand still. This the lesson from lizards. For all writers.” I hadn’t read those words yet, but I believed they were true.  Write as though your life depended on it.  Write fast and often. Write everything that was in your heart and you would surely find your calling.   When you write quickly without stopping to edit you are writing from truth.  You are writing from the heart.  Editing can come later. Style can come later.  Don’t stop to look around or, like the lizard, you will become someone’s dinner.